Moss Tension Fabric Technology at the Sea Ketch

 
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A vintage postcard from the summer of 1983 showing the Sea Ketch Rooftop Restaurant in Hampton Beach, New Hampshire. The Moss-designed enclosed canopy allowed for all season dining at the Sea Ketch. In the winter the clear plastic sides were zipped closed, while in the summer they remained open for outdoor dining.

A Fan of the Moss Star Gazer Tent

 
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Hi there, I have a Moss Stargazer II which I bought in the late 1980s. The most amazing tent. I was telling friends about it (I now live in Australia and the tent is in storage in New Zealand, soon to be sent here) and I said it was the most beautiful tent ever made—when they scoffed I looked it up online to show them a picture only to find that it is in the collection at MOMA. No more needed to be said. I wasn’t surprised to find out that Bill Moss was an artist either. The skylight was a stroke of genius —I used to say that the only thing that tent didn’t have was a cappuccino maker. When we set off with it to kayak and camp in Glacier National Park, my boyfriend at the time, who recommended the tent, promised it would indeed produce a cappuccino and a chocolate croissant each morning ...
— Nan S.

Traveling By Motorcycle with the Moss Olympic

 
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Kurt Meyer and Harumi Higashi camped in this Olympic Tent while traveling by motorcycle around the world in the 1980s.

The trip through the Sahara Desert was the most amazing and adventurous...it was just beautiful, clean, wild, not spoiled by anything
— Kurt Meyer


Shade in the Desert

Photo: David Blehert

Photo: David Blehert

The Parawing, with it’s unique open-air design, enabled us to enjoy the warmth of the desert, while protecting us from the intense noonday sun. The simple design allowed us to set up the Parawing in even treeless and sandy soil.

After several weeks the gnats made their appearance and we decided to retreat to the more enclosed, yet open and airy, Encore. It had more space than the conventional two-person tent, and Mom and Dad were able to sleep calmly without worry of crushing co-adventurer Alison Teal Blehert Koehn, age three weeks, or any of her potentially ‘uncomfortable’ toys and ‘equipment.’ After years spent in smaller tents, it was a joy to luxuriate in such spaciousness. Like all Moss products, and even in the worst of spring storms, it set up faster than a hungry baby could cry.
— David Blehert, Debbie Koehn & Baby Alison Teal, Canyonlands Desert Trip, Utah

A Parawing Wall in Tucson, Arizona

Photo: Geoffrey Bruce

Photo: Geoffrey Bruce

Bill Moss designed this Parawing Wall for a hand surgeon in Tucson, Arizona. The structure, which Geoffrey Bruce built, consisted of seventeen blue kite forms attached to slender steel poles and cabled to the ground.

Finding a Moss Tent at a Garage Sale

What a fortuitous find in Montreal...

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My son (12 years old and a very active Scout) and I drove by a garage sale that was selling some camping items. We saw the Therma-Rests first, then we saw a tent.

The man explained to me with great enthusiasm that this was a Moss tent. I told him I knew North Face, Trango, etc... but I did not know Moss. We took the tent out - there were a few tears. We did not buy the tent but we did leave our phone number. We then went home, made a few phone calls, went online, and had a lengthy conversation with my husband (canoeing and camping enthusiast) who did not want us to buy the tent, so we did not buy the tent...

Then the man from the garage sale called and told me the tent was still available - we negotiated a price, returned and set up the tent - it was missing the pegs, and the poles were a little warped,but my son and I felt good about it and thought we could clean it up.

We took it home and set it up for my husband. He blasted it with a hose with my son in the tent. No water got in it. They spent a couple of hours repairing the tent.

My son (one of three) is now the proud owner of a Moss tent and he is thrilled. He cannot wait to use it.
Thought you might enjoy this story.
— Margo and Dave, Montreal

A Moss Event Tent

The Hammond Castle Event Tent for the Summer Theatre Arts Camp in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

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Moss Encore

without a rainfly, set up next to a Parawing. A good memory on a warm spring day in Maine. #tbt

Photo: Ben Magro

Photo: Ben Magro

Moss Airdrop Disaster Shelters

Bill Moss had long been interested in designing instant shelters that could house survivors of natural disasters. He believed his goal of making large shelters in small containers in the smallest amount of time was the perfect solution for getting survivors the shelter they needed, especially in areas that could not be reached by ground vehicles. Why not drop the shelter and supplies out of the sky?

Top Left: this sketch shows the dropping and opening of the airdrop disaster shelter. Bottom Left: an airdrop project demonstration. Top Right: the airdrop project crew: Peter Kuttner, Randall Lasky, Shaun Jackson and Terry Beaubois. Bottom Right: a prototype of the airdrop shelter, a nylon dome-shaped structure with fiberglass tubular poles. It opened immediately upon landing on the ground and could provide shelter for six adults.

Top Left: this sketch shows the dropping and opening of the airdrop disaster shelter. Bottom Left: an airdrop project demonstration. Top Right: the airdrop project crew: Peter Kuttner, Randall Lasky, Shaun Jackson and Terry Beaubois. Bottom Right: a prototype of the airdrop shelter, a nylon dome-shaped structure with fiberglass tubular poles. It opened immediately upon landing on the ground and could provide shelter for six adults.

What the Hell is a Pop-Tent?

From a brochure designed by Bill Moss in the 1950s. #tbt

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And a promotional photo of the Pop-Tent itself near the Huron RIver in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

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Jack Larsen & Bill Moss Collaborate at LongHouse Reserve in East Hampton, NY

Textile designer, Jack Larsen, and Bill Moss collaborated on outdoor garden designs and sculptures at Larsen's LongHouse Reserve in the mid-1970s.  Below is Bill's Fleur de Lis fabric sculpture in situ.

Photo: Susan Wood

Photo: Susan Wood

 

There is a terrific article on LongHouse Reserve by Emily J. Weitz in  in the New York Times (4/12/15)

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/12/nyregion/longhouse-reserve-plays-host-to-nature-and-art.html?ref=nyregion

 

And below is Dale Chihuly's wonderful Cobalt Reeds, currently on view.

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